"The presence of parents paying attention to their child makes a  child happy. She feels secure that we are there for her, that we love her."

About the Project

Beliefs, Values and Practices

Impact of Migration

Barriers and Support

Resource Centre

Research Report

This web-site was developed by St. Joseph's Women's Health Centre for the use of service providers to support them in promoting positive cross-cultural attachment practices in their programming. It came out of the findings of the project:

  • Sharing Attachment Practices Across Cultures: Learning from Immigrants
    and Refugees

Why look at attachment practices across cultures?

Parents' attachment beliefs, values, and practices differ around the world. Although the attachment relationship is universal, parents' attachment beliefs, values, and practices differ around the world. There is an increasing number and increasing diversity of immigrants and refugees coming to Canada from countries where attachment practices may differ from those which are dominant in Canadian health and social service milieus. When serving immigrant and refugee families it is important to consider whether the variation in their attachment relationships, is based on differing beliefs and values related to parenting, as well as different goals for each stage of a child's development.

Click here for further information


To download the complete toolkit click here


The purpose of the project was to collect community-based information on parent-child attachment practices from participants in CAPC (Community Action Program for Children), CPNP (Canadian Prenatal Nutrition Program), and other community-based agencies, in their own words, to inform program and service delivery.

To find out more about the project click here



About the project | Beliefs, Values, & Practices | Impact of Migration |
Barriers & Support | Resource Centre | Research Report | Francais